Why Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) in D.C.?

With the complex intersections of age, mental health, economics, and deep societal inequities, even deeply affordable housing is out of reach for many Village clients.

That is why N Street Village provides Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH), which combines affordable housing with supportive services that provide clients with the tools to cope with mental health, addiction, trauma, physical health problems and other issues they might be experiencing.

According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness, PSH reduces the usage of publicly funded crisis services (like jails, hospitalizations, and emergency departments), and increases stability and well-being.

N Street Village is currently the largest provider of PSH for women in D.C., offering over 140 units combined at the Flagship location, Erna’s House, Miriam’s House and Phyllis Wheatley YWCA.

*Source: 2015 National Alliance to End Homelessness Report on Permanent Supportive Housing

Reflections on Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Dear Friends,

In keeping with my tradition, I wanted to write you this reflection today as we celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King. Here at N Street Village a vital part of our mission and our commitment is to be engaged in the cause of furthering social justice.

Every day we are witness to the racial injustice which persists in America today. I believe that we are also called to hold fast to the dream of true equality and liberation toward which Dr. King pointed and to discern our individual roles in its pursuit.

I think often about my responsibility as a white leader and what it means to be an ally in the struggle for racial justice – particularly in a time of national crisis when hatred and bigotry has been invited out of the shadows and has become so visible and vulgar on “main street.”

We are a long way from where so many of us would like to be – our work is far from over. And those of us born in the 60’s or before know that we are starting to pass the torch to a younger generation of people in hopes that you will go farther and longer than we have been able.

This year I want to share with you three things: a short movie (15 minutes), a medium length listen (30 minutes), and a quick read (5 minutes). These are things which have affected me over this past year, and I hope you will find interest, learning and inspiration from them. They all revolve in some way around the current and historical issues of segregation, the disenfranchisement of the Black community, and DC’s particular racial equity challenges related to affordable housing and homelessness.

  1. Segregated by Design: This short film is narrated by Richard Rothstein, author of The Color of Law and it borrows from his work. It is a vivid and clear (and quick) education about the ways in which African Americans have deliberately segregated by legal (“de jure”) means, denied the wealth accumulation enjoyed by the white community, and ultimately fated to impoverished communities and an intergenerational cycle of poverty.
  2. Ta-Nehisi Coates Interview: You may be familiar with Coates, who became well-known after publishing articles in The Atlantic and elsewhere – one of which was called The Case for Reparations. In that article, Coates argues that during slavery and post-slavery, white wealth accumulation in America was created ‘on the backs of Black labor which was stolen.’
  3. Racial Equity preface to Homeward DC 2.0: As you probably know, the Interagency Council on Homelessness will be releasing our second iteration of our city-wide plan to address homelessness in two months (at the March 10th Full Council meeting, open to the public: 2pm @ 441 4th Street (One Judiciary Square)). Last summer I co-chaired a sub-committee on Racial Equity with Robert Warren from the People for Fairness Coalition. Our assignment was to discuss how the topic of racial equity should be embedded into Homeward DC 2.0. There had been no explicit mention of racial equity in our 1.0 version and we sought to correct this.

In gratitude for all of your good work, and wishing us all a year ahead with more justice, more peace,

Schroeder Stribling
N Street Village CEO

Did You See Us in The Washington Post?

You did it! We are excited to share this record-setting three year partnership total thanks to Washington Post readers, staff, and Village friends. Thank you to all who have followed along on this journey and shared in the stories of hope and healing!

Columnist John Kelly wrote nearly 30 stories featuring clients and alumna like Cheryl (pictured), who showcased the Village’s programs, impact, and history.

2017 Washington Post Helping Hand articles:

2018 Washington Post Helping Hand articles:

2019 Washington Post Helping Hand articles:

CEO Schroeder Stribling Speaks at HAND Housing Networking Event

This morning, CEO Schroeder Stribling participated in HAND Housing’s “Network with a Twist” – an exclusive opportunity to dialogue with leadership from the Village alongside Enterprise Community Partners/CPDC and Paradigm Companies about leadership, motivation, and professional development.

Angela

My name is Angela and I am overwhelmed with gratitude to be able to share my story with you.

Your generosity has given me a gift I never thought was possible. You see, before I came to N Street Village, I was living on porches and streets.

When I walked through the Village doors, I left behind a life of drugs, addiction, violence, and homelessness that started when my father died. As his primary caretaker, I’d given up my job to help him. When he passed, my family took everything. I was homeless and alone.

A mental health advocate found me sleeping at a bus station and told me about N Street Village’s emergency shelter. She drove me there herself, and I was able to get a bed that night!

I started going to the Village Day Center, where I was able to get warm winter clothes, good meals, and connect with the staff and other clients. Hearing the stories from the community showed me that I was not alone in what I was going through. I started to feel motivated and truly believe I could do this!

It took time, but I slowly started to feel like myself again.

I worked hard at my recovery for nine months in the shelter. I had a great housing specialist who helped me get connected to permanent housing at the Village.

Today, I’m the one who shares my story with the women in the Day Center. I tell them, “Stay strong, don’t give up on yourself. Get involved. Stay positive, stay motivated!”

I know it is possible because I’ve been there, and I know what it takes.

Thank you for giving me hope, a community of courageous sisters, and a reason to celebrate!

D.C. Hypothermia Hotline: What You Need to Know

Save and share the Hotline number: (202) 399-7093 or 311. When calling, please include the time, the address or location of the sighting, and a description of the individual.

If there is an immediate risk to safety, always call 911.

Hypothermia alerts are activated when the forecasted temperature, including wind chill, is or will be 32° F or below; or, when the temperature is forecasted to be 40° F or below, and the forecasted chance of precipitation is fifty percent or greater.

Additional resources, including warming centers, are open around the city and available to individuals. Free transportation can be provided 24/7.

For more information, visit D.C.’s Department of Human Services website: https://dhs.dc.gov/service/hypo-hyperthermia-watch.

Village CEO Speaks at Community Chronic Homelessness Panel

Today, we are proud to have Village CEO Schroeder Stribling speaking alongside Miriam’s Kitchen, the Greater Washington Community Foundation, and the Downtown DC Business Improvement District to talk about ways we can work together as a city to create permanent and dignified solutions for individuals experiencing homelessness. This panel was part of the Partnership to End Homelessness Donor Learning Series focusing on “The Truth about Chronic Homelessness.”

Village CEO Presents to D.C. Superior Court Judges

Village CEO Schroeder Stribling presented to the Super Court Judges, including Judge Ann Keary, Presiding Judge, DC Superior Court (pictured).

Thank You, Village!

Staff Spotlight: Meet Sangita!

Sangita Joshi is a cornerstone of our Village family – in the 11 years she has been here, she has served the Village clients with heart and passion.

How long have you been at N Street Village? I have been a part of the N Street Village family for a little over 11 years! I am currently the Director of Case Management, which includes managing the Holistic Housing Program.

What is the Holistic Housing Program? When naming this program, we intentionally chose to call it holistic because that is what it truly is – recognizing the whole of a woman’s experiences and helping her to uncover and realize what she needs to be her best self. The program is located on the fifth floor of the Flagship building and can support up to 21 women as they make strides in their recovery – whether that is mental health, physical health, trauma, substance use disorder and/or financial insecurity. Last month, we were proud to have five women graduate and move on to the next step in their journey.

Can you describe N Street Village in three words? Hope. Courage. Patience. What is your favorite ice cream flavor? I am an ice cream connoisseur! If I wasn’t working at N Street Village, my dream job would be working as an official taste tester for Ben and Jerry’s. As far as my current favorite, it depends…but we can start with Phish Food. My dad always says that no matter how full you are, there is always room for ice cream!